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Breaking Point: Tackling Systemic Racism in North Carolina

July 16, 2020 @ 12:30 pm - 1:30 pm

This video event will explore structural racism through a variety of lenses. How do we confront racism, re-imagine public safety and heal?

About this Event

Join us at charlotteobserver.com/breakingpoint

George Floyd’s brutal death, which ignited weeks of protests across America, also has prompted new and meaningful conversations throughout our country about systemic racism and the inequities it has borne. We’re proud to host one of those conversations with “Breaking Point: Tackling Systemic Racism in North Carolina.”

This video event will explore structural racism through a variety of lenses. We’ll talk about the intersection of policing, criminal justice and race along with a discussion of economic and other inequities afflicting our communities. We’ll explore both history and steps forward. How do we confront racism, reimagine public safety and heal?

This hour-long event will be moderated by Peter St. Onge, Opinion editor for the Charlotte Observer, Raleigh News & Observer and Durham Herald-Sun, and Michael Williams, a consultant and founder of the Black on Black Project, an organization that works with artists on exhibitions and events that unpack issues affecting N.C. communities.

We’ve assembled a stellar group of panelists from North Carolina, including:

Co-moderator: Michael Williams is a consultant and founder of the Black on Black Project, an organization that works with artists on exhibitions and events that unpack issues affecting N.C. communities. Williams spent 15 years with the Raleigh News & Observer and has hosted community conversations across North Carolina, including Raleigh, Charlotte, Fayetteville and Wilmington.

The Rev. Dr. William J. Barber II, President & Senior Lecturer of Repairers of the Breach and Co-Chair of the Poor People’s Campaign: A National Call For Moral Revival. Rev. Dr. Barber is also the architect of the Forward Together Moral Movement that gained national acclaim with its Moral Monday protests at the North Carolina General Assembly in 2013.

Braxton Winston, whose stance of defiance during 2016 protests of a Charlotte police shooting launched an activism and national profile that eventually led to a seat on the Charlotte City Council. As both a public official and protester, Winston has unique perspectives on systemic racism and the challenges in confronting inequities.

Kristie Puckett Williams, the Statewide Campaign for Smart Justice Manager for the ACLU of North Carolina and a working scholar in Mass Incarceration. Having survived domestic violence, drug addiction, and long term incarceration via community corrections, she is now an advocate and activist, fighting for the rights of all marginalized and disenfranchised people.

Bree Newsome joined the national conversation on race in 2015 when, in the wake of the shooting of nine Charleston parishioners, she climbed the flagpole at the South Carolina statehouse and pulled down the Confederate flag. Newsome, an accomplished artist, continues to be a powerful and thoughtful voice on injustice and racial discrimination.

U.S. Rep Alma Adams, who is serving her third full term representing the 12th Congressional District of North Carolina and has been a powerful voice for minority populations in Congress.

Dr. Melissa N. Stuckey is assistant professor of African American history at Elizabeth City State University (ECSU) in northeastern North Carolina. She is committed to engaging the public in conversation about black freedom struggles in the United States. Stuckey is author of several journal and magazine articles and is currently completing her first book, entitled “All Men Up”: Seeking Freedom in the All-Black Town of Boley, Oklahoma.

Details

Date:
July 16, 2020
Time:
12:30 pm - 1:30 pm

Organizer

Charlotte Observer