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To commemorate and celebrate the contributions to our nation made by people of African descent, American historian Carter G. Woodson established Black History Week. The first celebration occurred on Feb. 12, 1926. For many years, the second week of February was set aside for this celebration to coincide with the birthdays of abolitionist/editor Frederick Douglass and Abraham Lincoln. In 1976, as part of the nation’s bicentennial, the week was expanded to a month. Since then, U.S. presidents have proclaimed February as National African-American History Month.

Governor Roy Cooper has proclaimed February 2021 as Black History Month in North Carolina.

At UNC-Chapel Hill, numerous events are held across campus during Black History Month in recognition of the historical background that has shaped the contributions of African Americans to our country. These include panel discussions, lectures, performances and more.

Additional resources can be found at the bottom of the page.

Please check this page often for updates.

Monday, February 1

Black Excellence: The History of the Black ESOP Student
12–1 p.m.

Please join us for the kickoff of Black History Month at the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy! This panel will feature Black alumni from different generations: The Bachelor’s in Pharmacy, the Legacy curriculum, a recent graduate, and even one of our earliest Black graduates. Learn about their experiences and how they utilized their education to elevate themselves within healthcare.

Panelists will include Mr. William Wicker (C/O 1967), Dr. Eula Beasley (C/O 1983), Dr. Kevin Wiltz II (C/O 2004), Dr. Daijha Anderson (C/O 2018).

REGISTER HERE

 

Tuesday, February 2

Black Unity: Bridging the Gap
6 p.m.

Join the Black Student Movement for the first Black Unity event of the semester. Discussion will focus on Blackness and ways to strengthen our community.

REGISTER HERE

 

Thursday, February 4

Black History Month Conversation Series: “Remembering Our Past; Focused on our Future”
11 a.m.–12 p.m.

The School of Education will host the Black History Month Conversation Series throughout African American Heritage Month. With the theme “Remembering Our Past; Focused on our Future,” the first speaker of the series will be Dr. S. Kent Butler, University of Central Florida

REGISTER HERE

 

Black Queer History
6 p.m.

The Black Student Movement will host “Black Queer History,” an event to discuss the history of Black queer people in social movements.

REGISTER HERE

 

Tuesday, February 9

The Legacy of Reconstruction and the Rise of Jim Crow
5:30 p.m.

Emmy Award-winning filmmaker, literary scholar and cultural critic Henry Louis Gates, Jr., the spring 2021 Frey Foundation Distinguished Visiting Professor, will discuss “The Legacy of Reconstruction and the Rise of Jim Crow” in conversation with Karla Slocum in this free webinar. Gates is the Alphonse Fletcher University Professor and director of the Hutchins Center for African & African American Research at Harvard University. Slocum is the director of UNC’s Institute of African American Research and professor of anthropology.

REGISTER HERE

 

The State of Black America
6–7 p.m.

The Black Student Movement will host an open discussion about the Black Lives Matter Movement and the current state of the world.

REGISTER HERE

 

“All the Songs We Sing” Author Readings with the Carolina African American Writers’ Collective
7–8 p.m.

Join the University Libraries to hear Carolina graduates and members of the Carolina African American Writers’ Collective talk about the Collective and read excerpts from their works in “All the Songs We Sing,” the new anthology that marks the group’s 25th anniversary. A Q&A will follow the readings.

CAAWC got its start with monthly meetings in poet Lenard D. Moore’s Raleigh home in August 1995. Over the years, this community has helped hone the skills of many celebrated writers, including Evie Shockley, 2018 Pulitzer Prize finalist in poetry; Camille T. Dungy, a 2019 winner of a Guggenheim Fellowship for Creative Arts; and Fred Joiner, the Carrboro poet laureate and winner of a 2019 Academy of American Poets Laureate Fellowship.

Presenters for the evening:

L. Teresa Church, Ph.D., has been a member of the Carolina African American Writers’ Collective since 1995. Her writings have appeared in publications including Simply Haiku; One Window’s Light: A Collection of Haiku; The Heron’s Nest; Obsidian: Literature in the African Diaspora; Solo Café; Nocturnes: (Re)view of the Literary Arts; African American Review; and North Carolina Literary Review. Her chapbooks include “Hand-Me-Down Calicos” and “Beyond the Water Dance.”

REGISTER HERE

 

Wednesday, February 10

Black Physician Leadership Panel
6:30–7:30 p.m.

The UNC Student National Medical Association will host the Black Leadership Panel. This panel will consist of Black physicians detailing their leadership roles in UNC Health, as well as their descriptions of their journeys to get there.

REGISTER HERE

 

Thursday, February 11

Black History Month Conversation Series: “Remembering Our Past; Focused on our Future”
11 a.m.–12 p.m.

The School of Education will host the Black History Month Conversation Series throughout African American Heritage Month. With the theme “Remembering Our Past; Focused on our Future,” the second speaker of the series will be Dr. Paul Harris, Associate Professor, University of Virginia.

REGISTER HERE

 

Black Love
6–7 p.m.

Having trouble dating in a pandemic? Looking to meet new people? If so, the Black Student Movement has the perfect event for you!

REGISTER HERE

 

Tuesday, February 16

Black Excellence in Pharmacy Keynote Address: Dr. John E. Clark
12–1 p.m.

Dr. John E. Clark, PharmD, MS, FASH, FFSHP will be joining UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy’s Black History Month celebration to present the keynote address. As a professor, clinical pharmacist, published author, and distinguished speaker, Dr. Clark will share a historical review of the contributions of African American women in pharmacy and an early analysis of the way early African American pharmacy schools impacted health disparities.

REGISTER HERE

 

Thursday, February 18

Black History Month Conversation Series: “Remembering Our Past; Focused on our Future”
11 a.m.–12 p.m.

The School of Education will host the Black History Month Conversation Series throughout African American Heritage Month. With the theme “Remembering Our Past; Focused on our Future,” the third speaker of the series will be Dr. William Jackson, CEO, Village of Wisdom.

REGISTER HERE

 

Equal Protection’s Grand Promise and Betrayals: Reconstruction, Plessy to Bakke and Beyond: Is there a Way Forward? (DAY 1)
9 a.m.–5:30 p.m.

The UNC Center for Civil Rights is partnering with Honors Carolina and the Institute for the Arts & Humanities to host a free, 2-day symposium to explore school desegregation, housing and employment law, access to governmental services, the criminal justice system, voting rights, and higher education. Featured speakers include Dean Erwin Chemerinsky of Berkeley, Professor Eric Foner of Columbia (Frank Porter Graham Lecture), former United States Attorney General Eric Holder (The Weil Lecture on American Citizenship), and Professor Ted Shaw of UNC School of Law. This first day of the symposium will feature an opening address by Erwin Chemerinsky, Dean and Jess H. Choper Distinguished Professor of Law, University of California at Berkeley School of Law, panel discussions on “Beyond Chattel Slavery” and “The Legal Challenge that Yielded Brown v. Board of Education” and more.

REGISTER HERE

 

Verzuz Battle
6 p.m.

The Black Student Movement will host the “Verzuz Battle.” Come put your music taste to the test.

REGISTER HERE

 

Friday, February 19

Equal Protection’s Grand Promise and Betrayals: Reconstruction, Plessy to Bakke and Beyond: Is there a Way Forward? (DAY 2)
9 a.m.–3:15 p.m.

Day two of this 2-day symposium will feature a keynote address by Former Attorney General Eric Holder, who will deliver the Weil Lecture on American Citizenship, panels on “The Contemporary Legal Battlefield: Affirmative Action in Higher Education,” “The Way[s} Forward: In the Universities,” and “The Way[s] Forward: The Constitutional Campaign.”

REGISTER HERE

 

EROT Presents: For the Love of Ebony
6 p.m.

This open mic, hosted by the Black Student Movement, is a celebration of Black History Month, black love, the love of blackness and all it encompasses. Reflecting on the past year, we associate blackness with trauma, but at this open mic, IT’S ALL LOVE, BABY! Come talk about your boo, your battles with racism or your blackness. Or just come to listen.

REGISTER HERE

 

Saturday, February 20

Feed Your Soul
12–2:30 p.m.

The Black Student Movement will be partnering with Mama Dip’s and CUAB to sponsor meals for 60 students.

REGISTER HERE

Monday, February 22

Sip & Paint
6–7 p.m.

The Black Student Movement will host a virtual Sip & Paint. To receive paint supplies for this event, please complete this form to RSVP for a pick-up date.

REGISTER HERE

 

A Reading, Conversation, and Q&A
7:30–9:30 p.m.

The first of two events of the 2021 Frank B. Hanes Writer-in-Residence Program, this event will feature Rev. William Barber II and NC Poet Laureate Jaki Shelton Green. Gene Nichol will moderate.

REGISTER HERE

Tuesday, February 23

Black Excellence: Enduring Desegregation at ESOP
5–6:30 p.m.

Join this live discussion about the history of desegregation at southern schools of pharmacy and the history of systemic efforts to maintain segregation in professional programs. This presentation will feature vignettes of the first Black graduates from the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy and the role of segregation in their experiences. This will serve as the closing event for the Eshelman School of Pharmacy’s Black History Month celebrations.

Speakers: Dr. Gregory Bond, Christian Brown, Dr. Ben Urick

REGISTER HERE

 

Abbey Speaker Series: Defining Racial Justice in the 21st Century
5:30–7 p.m.

In the wake of a summer of protests against police brutality, the midst of an ongoing pandemic, and the aftermath of a contentious election, this event brings together a panel of Black academic, journalistic, religious, and political leaders to discuss and debate their different definitions of what racial justice looks like – and how it might be achieved – in the twenty-first century.

The Program for Public Discourse will host the Abbey Speaker Series: “Defining Racial Justice in the 21st Century.” the event features a panel discussion between Black journalistic, political, academic and religious leaders. Speakers include Illinois State University Department of History Professor Dr. Touré Reed, NC State Senator Valerie Foushee and Executive Director of the Seymour Institute for Black Church and Policy Studies at Harvard University Dr. Jacqueline Rivers and will be moderated by New York Times columnist and CBS News political analyst Jamelle Bouie.

REGISTER HERE

 

African American History Month Lecture
6:30–7:30 p.m.

Distinguished journalist, educator and activist Charles E. Cobb will deliver the 2021 African American History Month Lecture. Cobb is a founding member of the National Association of Black Journalists. As a field secretary with the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), he originated the idea of Freedom Schools as a part of the 1964 Mississippi Freedom Summer Project. The memo he wrote proposing Freedom Schools as part of the 1964 Mississippi Summer Project described a project where schools should be designed to “fill an intellectual and creative vacuum in the lives of young Negro Mississippians.” Cobb began his journalism career in 1974 as a reporter for WHUR Radio in Washington, DC. In 1976, he joined the staff of National Public Radio as a foreign affairs reporter for NPR’s first regular coverage of Africa.

UNC’s African American History Month Lecture is an annual tradition that brings leading scholars and activists whose work centers on the lives of African Americans from both historical and contemporary perspectives. The lecture is open to the entire campus as well as the surrounding community and is the University’s major programming initiative to recognize the importance of African American histories nationally, statewide and on campus.

REGISTER HERE

 

Wednesday, February 24

Trivia Night: Black History Essentials
7 p.m.

Test your Black history essentials knowledge and join WUNC’s Kamaya Truitt and quizmaster Clayton Mack for a virtual trivia night that features questions specially prepared by North Carolina Central University’s Quiz Bowl team and Albermarle Regional Library. Have fun competing against friends and neighbors for a prize package from Bright Black Candles and some WUNC swag.

REGISTER HERE

 

Thursday, February 25

Black History Month Conversation Series: “Remembering Our Past; Focused on our Future”
11 a.m.–12 p.m.

The School of Education will host the Black History Month Conversation Series throughout African American Heritage Month. With the theme “Remembering Our Past; Focused on our Future,” the final speaker of the series will be Dr. Cheryl Holcomb-McCoy, Professor and Dean, School of Education, American University.

REGISTER HERE

 

Off the Shelf Author Talk with Regina Bradley “Chronicling Stankonia: The Rise of the Hip-Hop South”
12–1 p.m.

This talk is part of Off the Shelf, a collaboration between the University Libraries and the UNC Press to present new works on racial and social justice in our history and our world. The talk is co-presented by Southern Cultures and the Center for the Study of the American South. This virtual event will be hosted by Karina Soni, social media coordinator at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill University Libraries.

“Chronicling Stankonia: The Rise of the Hip-Hop South” is a vibrant book that pulses with the beats of a new American South, probing the ways music, literature and film have remixed Southern identities for a post–civil rights generation. This work, author Regina N. Bradley argues, helps define new cultural possibilities for Black Southerners who came of age in the 1980s and 1990s and have used hip-hop culture to buffer themselves from the historical narratives and expectations of the civil rights era.

“Chronicling Stankonia” reflects the ways that culture, race and Southernness intersect in the late 20th and early 21st centuries. Although part of Southern hip-hop culture remains attached to the past, Bradley demonstrates how younger Southerners use the music to embrace the possibility of multiple Souths, multiple narratives and multiple points of entry to contemporary Southern Black identity.

Bradley is an alumna Nasir Jones Hiphop Fellow at Harvard University and an assistant professor of English and African diaspora studies at Kennesaw State University.

REGISTER HERE

 

42nd Annual Minority Health Conference: “Body & Soul: The Past, Present and Future of Health Activism” (Day 1)
3–5 p.m.

The Minority Health Conference is the largest and longest-running student-led health conference in the country. The conference aims to raise awareness around health disparities and mobilize students, academics, and community members to take action for change. Started in 1977 by the Minority Student Caucus (MSC), the conference is nationally recognized and respected, attracting more than 500 attendees each year and hundreds more who view it via a webcast. This year’s focus is raising awareness of health disparities. Day 1 of the event will feature a Keynote by Dr. Victor Schoenbach, followed by a Q&A session.

REGISTER HERE

 

A Panel on Environmental Justice
3:30–4:45 p.m.

The second in the 2021 Frank B. Hanes Writers-in-Residence Program events, panelists will include Rev. William Barber II, NC Poet Laureate Jaki Shelton Green, NC Attorney General Josh Stein and other community members. WUNC-FM’s Leoneda Inge will moderate.

REGISTER HERE

 

Then and Now: UNC Through the Years
6–7 p.m.

The Black Student Movement will host this conversation with current students and Black alumni about the changes at UNC throughout the years.

REGISTER HERE

Friday, February 26

42nd Annual Minority Health Conference: “Body & Soul: The Past, Present and Future of Health Activism” (Day 2)
11 a.m.–4:15 p.m.

The Minority Health Conference continues with the William Small Jr. Keynote: Dr. Wizdom Powell, with a Q&A session to follow; breakout sessions and exhibitor/poster sessions.

REGISTER HERE

 

Sunday, February 28

Voices for Justice—Dar He: The Lynching of Emmett Till
3–4:30 p.m.

Mike Wiley Productions will return for a virtual live performance, “Voices for Justice.” The performance will be presented live from the stage of the Clayton Center and broadcast in real time via Zoom. Following the performance, participants will have the opportunity for a live, interactive Q&A session with Mike Wiley.

REGISTER HERE

 

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