Black History Month

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Each year a theme is announced by the founders of Black History Month, the Association for the Study of African American Life and History (ASALH) in Washington DC. This year ASALH is celebrating their centennial and have chosen “The Crisis in Black Education” as their theme.  An official state proclamation of Black History Month can be found here. This year’s African American History Month Lecture will feature keynote Brenda E. Stevenson, Nickoll Family Endowed Professor of History, UCLA, speaking on “When Do Black Female Lives Matter? Contested Assaults, Murders, and American Race Riots” The lecture, followed by a Q&A and book-signing, will take place on Wednesday February 8 (details below).

The following calendar includes events scheduled to take place at UNC-Chapel Hill during Black History Month. To submit an event for inclusion in the calendar, please scroll down and complete the form below.

February is Black History Month at UNC

WEEK ONE

Pathways to Responsible Activism
Thursday, February 2, 7:00 – 8:15 PM
Sonja Haynes Stone Center

Join keynote speaker Brittany Packnett, VP of National Community Alliances at Teach for America and one of Time‘s 12 New Faces of Black Leadership, to learn about her journey in becoming an activist for racial and social equity. Accompanying Brittany in a panel discussion and Q&A on social impact and responsibility are: Camile Jones, BSM President, Teach for America Alumna, and Policy/Advocate Fellow; Andrew Lakis, Executive Director of Teach for America, Eastern North Carolina; Atrayus Goode, President and CEO, Movement of Youth; and Travis Starkey, UNC Alum and Director, Alumni Impact at Teach for America.


Black and Blue Tour
Tour begins at UNC Visitor’s Center (Morehead Planetarium)
Friday, February 3, 3:00 – 4:30 PM

To reserve a space, please email mjfox@unc.edu. Call 919-962-1630 for questions and in case of inclement weather.

A distinctive walking tour on the African-American history of the University, with emphasis on the 19th and 20th centuries. The Black and Blue tour hopes to contribute to a real understanding of our African American past as we build a better Carolina and work to create a fuller perspective on our University’s history. Our guide, Robert Porter, has over 30 years of experience as a lecturer for UNC’s Department of African, African American, and Diaspora Studies, winning numerous teaching awards. He remains passionate about his interests in history, public history, and African-American history, all of which go back to his grade school days.

WEEK TWO

The Urgency of Black Feminism in Times of Crisis and Change
Sonja Haynes Stone Center Multipurpose Room
Tuesday, February 7, 12:30 – 1:45 PM

Panelists Keisha Khan-Perry (Africana Studies, Brown), Sharon Holland (American Studies, UNC-CH), and Pat Parker (Communication, UNC-CH) will discuss the relevance and significance of black feminist through and activism, in the U.S. and globally, in the current political moment. Kia Caldwell (African, African American, and Diaspora Studies, UNC-CH) will moderate. This event is part of the African, African-American, and Diaspora Studies Department’s Spring 2017 Colloquium Series.


The 13th annual African American History Month Lecture
Sonja Haynes Stone Center Auditorium
Wednesday, February 8, 7:00 PM

Brenda Stevenson, Nickoll Family Endowed Professor of History, UCLA will present “When Do Black Female Lives Matter? Contested Assaults, Murders, and American Race Riots.” The lecture will be followed by a Q&A and book signing. Dr. Stevenson’s intellectual interests center on the comparative, historical experiences of, and conflict among, women, family, and community across racial and ethnic lines.  Her areas of expertise include African American History, gender and family history, Atlantic World Slavery, and racial conflict.  She is the author of many scholarly articles.  Her book-length publications include: The Journals of Charlotte Forten Grimke (Oxford, 1989); Life in Black and White: Family and Community in the Slave South (Oxford, 1997); The Contested Murder of Latasha Harlins:  Justice, Gender and the Origins of the L.A. Riots (Oxford, 2013); and What is Slavery? (Polity, 2015). To read more about Brenda Stevenson, please click here.

The lecture will take place on Wednesday, February 8 at 7PM in the Stone Center Auditorium. Her lecture is titled, “When do Black Female Lives Matter? Contested Assaults, Murders, and American Race Riots”. This lecture will be followed by a Q&A and book signing. Please check our events calendar for more details. Questions regarding this event can be e-mailed to history@unc.edu.


Black and Blue Tour
Tour begins at UNC Visitor’s Center (Morehead Planetarium)
Friday, February 10, 3:00 – 4:30 PM

To reserve a space, please email mjfox@unc.edu. Call 919-962-1630 for questions and in case of inclement weather.

A distinctive walking tour on the African-American history of the University, with emphasis on the 19th and 20th centuries. The Black and Blue tour hopes to contribute to a real understanding of our African American past as we build a better Carolina and work to create a fuller perspective on our University’s history. Our guide, Robert Porter, has over 30 years of experience as a lecturer for UNC’s Department of African, African American, and Diaspora Studies, winning numerous teaching awards. He remains passionate about his interests in history, public history, and African-American history, all of which go back to his grade school days.


Public Celebration of the Exhibition “Fever Within”
Ackland Art Museum
Friday, February 10, 5:00 – 9:00 PM

During the Chapel Hill-Carrboro 2nd Friday ArtWalk, the public is invited the celebrate the Ackland’s special exhibition, “Fever Within: The Art of Ronald Lockett.”

“Fever Within” is a groundbreaking retrospective of a passionately inspired and little-understood figure in 20th Century American art. Raised in Bessemer, Alabama, near Birmingham, Lockett (1965-1998) was profoundly influenced by other self-taught African American artists in his closely knit community. The first solo exhibition of Ronald Lockett’s art, “Fever Within” emphasizes the powerful themes the artist explored over the course of his career, through about 50 of his works of art.

The exhibition, which was presented in 2016-17 at the American Folk Art Museum in New York and the High Museum of Art in Atlanta, marks the first time that viewers will be able to gain insight into the full range of Lockett’s innovative and evocative paintings and assemblages.

WEEK THREE

Black History Month Dinner
Ram’s Head Dining Hall
Wednesday, February 15, 5:00 – 8:00 PM

This yearly tradition features foods inspired by African-American history and culture. This year’s theme is Mardi Gras! Cajun and Creole foods like jambalaya, gumbo, and authentic Louisiana red beans and rice are likely to be on the menu.


Black History Month Tribute
Carmichael Arena

Thursday, February 16, 7:00 – 9:00 PM

The Carolina Black Caucus and the UNC Women’s Basketball Team will sponsor a Black History Month Tribute during the UNC vs. GA Tech Women’s Basketball Game. The game will be filled with the recognition of UNC’s African-American pioneers, music, and Black History trivia. For more info, contact cbcinfo1@unc.edu


Black and Blue Tour
Tour begins at UNC Visitor’s Center (Morehead Planetarium)
Friday, February 17, 3:00 – 4:30 PM

To reserve a space, please email mjfox@unc.edu. Call 919-962-1630 for questions and in case of inclement weather.

A distinctive walking tour on the African-American history of the University, with emphasis on the 19th and 20th centuries. The Black and Blue tour hopes to contribute to a real understanding of our African American past as we build a better Carolina and work to create a fuller perspective on our University’s history. Our guide, Robert Porter, has over 30 years of experience as a lecturer for UNC’s Department of African, African American, and Diaspora Studies, winning numerous teaching awards. He remains passionate about his interests in history, public history, and African-American history, all of which go back to his grade school days.


“Power!” Stokely Carmichael Performance
Stone Center
Friday, February 17, 7:00 – 9:00 PM

The Stone Center will present “Power! Stokely Carmichael,” a play written and performed by actor and playwright Meshaun Labrone and directed by Jennifer Knight. in June 1966, during the last great march of the Civil Rights Movement, a young activist changed the battle cry from “Freedom Now!” to “Power!” Now, on the 50th anniversary of this march, witness the rise of Stokely Carmichael, who would become the energizing force of the Black Power Movement. In this blistering one-man show, you will be transported back to the summer of 1966 and encounter multiple characters that Stokely Carmichael encountered ruing the days of the Civil Rights Movement. The production is tense, funny, heartbreaking, informative, engaging and non-stop entertaining.

This event is free and open to the public, but RSVP is request. Click here to RSVP.

WEEK FOUR

Music in the Galleries: The North Carolina Central University Choir
Ackland Art Museum
Sunday, February 19, 2:00 PM

In connection with the exhibition “Fever Within,” the North Carolina Central University Choir will perform at the Ackland Art Museum.

“Fever Within” is a groundbreaking retrospective of a passionately inspired and little-understood figure in 20th Century American Art. Raised in Bessemer, Alabama, near Birmingham, Lockett (1965-1998) was profoundly influenced by other self-taught African American artists in his closely knit community. The first solo exhibition of Ronald Lockett’s art, “Fever Within” emphasizes the powerful themes the artist explored over the course of his career, through about 50 of his works of art.


Black Business Roundtable: “Do You Have What It Takes?”
Hyde Hall
Wednesday, February 22, 5:30 PM

The 2nd annual Black Business Roundtable is an event that showcases leading Black professionals discussing matters of business and career advice in the industries of economics, entrepreneurship, financial management, higher education, non-profits, science, and sport. This year’s speakers are Patricia Brooks-Nobles, senior vice-president of Bank of America; Ben Ebong, Kenan-Flagler MBA ’16 and entrepreneur; William Keyes, UNC trustee; Dr. Elmira Mangum, former president of Florida A&M; Dr. Ruthie Lyle, the world’s #1 Black female patent holder; and Bruce Speight, director of media relations for NFL’s New York Jets. Join us for an inspiring fellowship of critical conversation, delicious food, and drink. Free to UNC students. Sponsored by Kenan-Flagler Business School.


Talk – Cameron Plantation to Cameron Place: The Making of a Black Homeland in Alabama
Pleasants Family Assembly Room – Wilson Library
Wednesday, February 22, 5:30 – 6:30 PM

Talk by Duke Emeritus Professor Syd Nathans

In his book A Mind to Stay: White Plantation, Black Homeland, Duke Emeritus Professor Syd Nathans tells a rare story—that of people sent in 1844 by planter Paul Cameron to labor on an Alabama cotton plantation, who became owners of the very land they worked in bondage, and whose descendants have held on to it since.

Using thousands of Cameron letters at the UNC Library’s Southern Historical Collection, and years of interviews with black descendants, Nathans traces the destiny of families rooted on the former plantation who viewed the planter as the man who homesteaded their forebears—selling to “all black and no white”—and who call their land “Cameron Place.” Through their story, he illuminates the meaning of land and landowning—first to the planter who bought the land in 1844, then to emancipated African Americans who chose to stay rather than leave, and finally to the generation that fought to make their homeland fully free.


Black and Blue Tour
Tour begins at UNC Visitor’s Center (Morehead Planetarium)
Friday, February 24, 3:00 – 4:30 PM

To reserve a space, please email mjfox@unc.edu. Call 919-962-1630 for questions and in case of inclement weather.

A distinctive walking tour on the African-American history of the University, with emphasis on the 19th and 20th centuries. The Black and Blue tour hopes to contribute to a real understanding of our African American past as we build a better Carolina and work to create a fuller perspective on our University’s history. Our guide, Robert Porter, has over 30 years of experience as a lecturer for UNC’s Department of African, African American, and Diaspora Studies, winning numerous teaching awards. He remains passionate about his interests in history, public history, and African-American history, all of which go back to his grade school days.


February is Black History Month at UNC

SUBMISSIONS

The Call for Calendar Submission is now Open and will close on January 30th, 2017.

 

 

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